Author Topic: Eve Blog  (Read 9384 times)

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« on: March 28, 2007, 05:00:03 PM »
Okay so a few of us have started playing EVE and I thought it would be interesting to start a blog detailing our activities. But first some history:

Initially I started playing EVE while discussing my ideas for an Outpost MMO with Betaray and Garrett. In explaining the details of gameplay and dynamics, Beta mentioned that I was explaining EVE almost exactly. Apparently he had played it for a while and gave me alot of information about it. I figured I had to try it out to see for myself. So I tried the Free trial account and started playing. I was pretty much blown away the first day by the fact that it wasn't asinine, noobish or immature like World of Warcraft certainly is. I started talking to Freeza and Beta about how much I liked it and eventually they joined in. In the first week I created a Corporation (similar to a guild in fantasy MMO terms) and the three of us started on venture mining and some missions, feeling out the game for what we wanted to do. Eventually Beta and I scouted for a system to base ourselves out of that was far enough out from the Galactic core that we would not be bothered by other players. We wanted a nice, quiet system where we could mine without fear of PVP players dropping in. We settled in the Lonetrek Region in the Okunda Constellation, a region of space that lies "above" the galactic core, at the end of an arm of stars that reaches into empty space. Eventually we settled in the last system in the constellation,   the Semiki system and headquartered ourselves in the Wiyrkomi Peace Corps station. One month into play and my bank screwed up my account and I wasnt able to play for about 22 days which ended last weekend. Over the course of my absence Freeza and Beta left my corp (Outpost Crime Syndicate) to create their own called Cosmic Vacuum Cleaners, headquartered in the same system.

Right now we are focused on mining to fund our expanding characters. Freeza has created a second EVE account so he can play two characters at the same time (providing himself with backup when he goes mining alone). Our primary miner is by far Freeza and he is doing an excellent job of keeping the flow of resources constant. Betaray has gone for combat and may eventually leave our corp for one of the largest corporations in the game. I am still recovering from my lost month by training essential skills and upgrading my ship.

So thats the history of our activity in EVE so far! Im going to be posting new blogs and updates to this thread so please keep topic replies short, clean and to the point. We invite anyone who is interested to try the EVE trial account and join our corp. We can get you setup and on your way alot faster than if you were on your own!
 

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2007, 05:39:49 PM »
Id like to post some informative blogs, giving you guys information on how EVE works. The game dynamics of EVE are much more complex than any other MMO I have seen. If any of you decide to join us, this info will help you a great deal and help explain the benefits of joining a Corporation.


Newbie Corps & Starting The Game

When you first start playing EVE, there is an extensive tutorial that I highly recommend you complete. Upon completion you are given a few bonus items (if you dont finish the tutorial you wont get them) and begin life inside the newbie station. Depending on the race you have chosen, you will be in one of the core systems for your race in a relatively large station. You will notice you are automatically a part of a Corporation. The name and type of the corp depends on how you created your character and their background. If you undock from your station and take a look outside, you will notice what kind of corporation you are in ;-) When you are in a corp, anyone else in the same corp will appear with a green icon on their ship. Just outside the newbie station (where everyone else starts) you will see a swarm of GREEN. You are in a corp that may contain hundreds or thousands of other newbie players. This is not a player-owned corporation. You will get very little benefit by belonging to it other than a slightly better standing with mission agents, which will get you better pay for completing missions. This almost nonexistent benefit means that belonging to a player-owned corp will give you a major advantage over the competition.

Player-Owned = Money

The most important commodity in EVE is money. Referred to as ISK, it is necessary for doing everything from buying ships, weapons and skills to putting a deposit down on items you wish to sell on the market. Sometimes you even have to pay to send people mail and messages! Belonging to a player-owned corporation means that you have someone actively tending to your needs. In most cases if you work for the corp and do what is needed, you will be compensated. The smaller the corp the better. As with the corporations we have owned and run, we either split everything evenly or let anyone take as much money as they need from the corporate bank account. However that is just because we know each other. In most corps you will have to put in some work to get the money you need by mining or participating in operations and missions. Usually upon joining a player-owned corp you will be given a large wad of cash to make your initial upgrades and purchase the skills the CEO wants you to learn. In most well-managed corporations, everyone is given a position and they must tailor their character to meet those requirements. If you want to be a miner the corp will tell you exactly which skills to study so that you can be the most efficient right away, without having to figure it all out on your own. If you want to be in combat as a shield tank, you will either be given the skills and ISK you need to buy a suitable ship and weapons or they will simply be given to you freely. This can save you months of work if you were all on your own or still a part of the newbie corp.

Some Tips About Skills

You should be aware of how EVE handles skills and levels to give you a better idea of the amount of time you may devote to it. Skills are a major part of the game and are handled differently in EVE than in most other MMOs. In EVE, you can only train one skill at a time. All skills have a maximum of 5 levels. Each level increases the amount of time it takes to train a skill. Skills are trained in real time. Skills can be trained whether or not you are logged in. There are some lvl5 skills that take weeks to complete. Most lvl1 skills complete in under 30 minutes. Currently there are 350 skills in EVE. It would take you years of real time to complete them all, but luckily you dont need that many to be effective in the game. Betaray, Freeza and I are piloting some of the largest ships in the game with powerful weapons after about 2 months of play. Freeza has accumulated more than 50 skills in that time.

Due to the length of time it takes to train skills and your characters reliance upon them, how you manage your skills will directly effect how you play. You are advised to manage your skills so that you are ALWAYS training a skill whether you are online or not. Each skill has a number of skillpoints associated with it. If you manage your training time well, you can get up to 1 million skill points per month of play. This would be a good time to talk about skills and death.

Death, Clones and Skills

When you die, it isnt forever. In EVE upon death you are brought back to life in a clone. But you pay a price for dying (in addition to losing your ship). You have to pay for your clone. The amount you pay determines the quality of the clone. The higher the quality of clone, the higher the skill point capacity. If you buy a clone of a quality that can support a certain amount of skill points, training skills that go over that amount means that your clone will lose any skill points over that number. For example if you buy a clone that can support 3 million skill points and you train skills that puts your total number of skill points at 4 million, you will lose 1 million skill points. That means you're not only losing skills, you're losing time and money. When you join a player-owned corporation most of the time they will give you a large amount of money so that you can immediately buy a good quality clone so that when you die (eventually everyone dies, get used to planning ahead) you do not lose any skills that you have spent time training.

Offline Hooman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4954
Eve Blog
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2007, 06:16:02 PM »
Well, now that I know where you are... time to send in the war ships.   ;)  

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2007, 09:35:33 PM »
Ha! Send them, for we are mighty. Do you play EVE?

Offline Savant 231-A

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 486
    • https://www.outpost2.net
Eve Blog
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2007, 02:37:49 AM »
hmmm... i think it's something like homeworld....
New Eden? lol
OMG - cool graphics....
I think that my computer won't be able to play this game...
Gordon Freeman, and mr. Crowbar would own Master Chief in any part of the day.
"Come here citizen."

"From the ashes of the collapse we seek to build a better world for all."

Offline Hooman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4954
Eve Blog
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2007, 02:44:30 AM »
The ships are on their way. ;)


Ok, maybe not. I don't play Eve. But I do have to question how smart it is to post your location on the net for all to see. Doesn't seem like the best way to stay safe to me. Especially since you had that whole bit about choosing some remote system way out in the middle of nowhere so people wouldn't run into you. If you don't want people to run into you and attack, then why are you telling them where you are?


Btw, this game sounds like it's a bit of a rip off of Trade Wars. That used to be a very popular multiplayer game back in the days of BBSes. Although, that's long dead now, and this sounds like the improved next generation version of that sort of game. If it is, then I'm sure it's loads of fun like Trade Wars was, but it also sounds a lot more time consuming. Something I can't afford. I think Runescape was a big enough wate of my life. Fun but pointless. I don't feel I can justify wasting that much more time on another game.

Although..., I did once join a game of Trade Wars (under an unknown alias) and using information obtained by watching over my brother's shoulder while he played, I mounted an attack on his system. Twice in one day. Not successful, but they didn't need to be. See in that game they had mines, and when you warped in half of whatever was there went off. It was overkill. Especially when I went back in my escape pod to pick off a few more. But nevertheless, it was a substantial investment to him to buy those mines, and it pissed him off to no end that I'd done that. Good thing he didn't know it was really me. :whistle:

Oh, and he also joined a game using someone else's alias (who had long since left) and joined a corporation of his enemies for the sole purpose of backstabbing them. He stole everything they had, even their planet. (He waited until it got planetary transwarp, and then took off with it and everything else). Destroyed the minor planets that couldn't be moved and didn't have much on them. That pissed them off to no end. Ahh, good times, you should try it. ;)
 

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2007, 06:48:34 AM »
The mechanics of EVE are a bit different from how it seems Hooman sees it. Something to note is that the in-game chat also displays the names of everyone in that system, it acts almost as a scanner. Meaning if someone wanted to find us, all they would have to do is go online and look for us in chat.

PVP combat is 99.999% opportunistic, meaning if you want to kill a player, you kill one that happens to be near you at that time. People are rarely hunted, except in the case of bounties where players may put a bounty on someones head and another player can collect it by taking that person out but not many bounties are actually carried out. In the few cases where someone has actively hunted someone else it is usually for a reason, like the CEO of a major corp wants to kill the CEO of another. These are so rare that they are usually chronicled in the forums as it would take a small fleet to *actually* cut off any and all methods of escape.

It doesnt matter who knows where we are because we arent important or valuable. There are tens of thousands of other players that are worth more than we are or ever will be. Our system has no real benefit other than it is far away. It is not resource-rich and the local market is extremely poor. Semiki could only sustain a very small group of people (less than twenty) and the amount of resources it takes to support a single high-level player could not be found there. There is no reason for us to be attacked or feared.

We really only chose the system because there is no traffic - there is only one gate in or out  - we are the last link in a short chain of useless, empty systems. This is exactly what we wanted. A place where we could dink around figuring ourselves out, slowly building up our meager resources until we are ready to move on to the "real" universe of EVE, not just the little rock we have hidden ourselves under.

Had it not been for Freeza's honorable devotion of mining, we would have been forced to move into more populated space long ago. But since he spends so much time mining, we are able to make a living there. If our corp had a larger number of members we could certainly not do what we are doing. From what I have seen it is possible to have a corporation of 10 or less members and still remain invisible to other players in EVE. Anything larger than 20 and your activities will eventually get noticed by someone. If that someone happens to be part of a ruthless corp, they may decide to take out some small-timers just for the fun of it. In our current state we are too weak and too few to be worth the time it would take to kill us.

#######

I played EVE this evening on a laptop Ive had since 2001 that had a software graphics adapter. You can run EVE.

#######

From the description of Trade Wars, EVE does seem similar except that EVE is not a numbers game. It is possible to play it by economy and numbers, there is much more depth to it. In EVE, resources are not fixed. The entire economy is supported by the players. Every item available in the entire game was crafted by a human player. Very few items in the EVE universe are "spawned" by the server. Even asteroid fields where resources are mined eventually disappear forever due to over mining. The universe of EVE is influenced drastically by the players. The largest object a player (or players or a corporation of players) can own in EVE is a Player Owned Station (with the exception of Titans) so the roof of the economy stops at stations. In EVE you are mostly dealing in terms of starships, transportable commodities and enforcement of territory.

The galactic core is controlled by one of the 4 Empires and they are not at war, meaning you are pretty much safe flying around these systems. Each system has a rating. Anything between 1.0 and 0.5 is considered safe (1.0 to 0.8 is considered zero-risk). Below that number and the galactic police force known as CONCORD cannot enforce peace and ensure that some player wont kill you. Below 0.4 systems are decreasingly patrolled by CONCORD and PVP occurs there more often. Lastly, 0.0 space are systems where no central authority patrols. It is essentially the wild west where PVP is constant. The arms of the galacy, toward the rim is where 0.0 space exists and the farther out from the core you are, the more the security rating decreases. Player corporations can stake claim to these systems, claiming sovereignty over them. The markets in 0.0 space are driven solely by corp players who are usually building and trading for the sake of the other players belonging to their corp. Players may build their player owned stations in these areas but they are incredibly expensive to build and would require a corporation with no less than 50 members and alot of time. With less than 50 people defending a station, that amount of time is more than enough for a rival to mount an attack and destroy it before completion. Any more than 50 members and eventually they would catch the eye of the megacorps (100's of members) and would be taken out by a fleet that makes up to 23% of the total players in EVE..

This means that you are usually dealing with members of the large corporations, the ones that control large swaths of the galaxy and may have hundreds or thousands of members. You would only deal with them if you went into 0.0 space which lies in the "outer rim" sections of the galaxy. This is also why we feel so safe publicly announcing our location. If you come to our system and kill us, you wont be able to escape from CONCORD eliminating you and we would have legal kill rights on your clone meaning you would get to die twice at our hands.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2007, 07:05:34 AM by dm-horus »

Offline Hooman

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4954
Eve Blog
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2007, 06:58:26 PM »
Definately sounds a lot like tradewars.

Although, you couldn't really do anything useful with a planet in fed space in Trade Wars. You could make them, put people on them, and collect the resources. But you couldn't build defenses. So anybody could just come along, claim it, and take everything. Similar deal with the space lanes between fed space. You could build defenses on a planet, but not to a very high level, since any defenses that could impede traffic would be destroyed by the feds. There were also rules for player vs player combat in fed space, but everywhere else was fair game, including the space lanes. Depending on your experience and/or alignment, they might protect you. But if you were armed past a certain point and had quit the game, they'd kick you out into some random sector (eventually), thus leaving you exposed. It was basically a way to protect new players still trying to get established, but you really had to get out on your own to really flourish.

During which time you'd really hoped noone found where you were building up. Definately something you wanted to keep secret in that game.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2007, 06:59:32 PM by Hooman »

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2007, 09:27:34 PM »
It doesnt matter who knows where you are in EVE. nobody is out to get us and it would be a waste of anyones time to do so. the gamer community in EVE is very mature. Oh and you cant do anything with planets in EVE.

Offline Freeza-CII

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2308
Eve Blog
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2007, 04:50:51 AM »
Quote
the gamer community in EVE is very mature

No its not there are idiots every where a bunch of snot nose kids like 14 and under that get all the hand me downs from there big brother or sister.  And what do they do kill any thing they can.  maturity PFF.

You cant lay claim to any thing but systems that are the extreem low security.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2007, 04:58:25 AM by Freeza-CII »

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2007, 06:53:08 AM »
relatively speaking eve is more mature than other mmo's like WoW. you cant really argue with that. and yeah, you cant really claim anything unless its 0.0 space.

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2007, 03:59:51 AM »
The Experiment

Today I began my experiment with PVP corporations and alliances. I found a small corp that was in a large alliance (The Myriad Alliance)consisting of many dozens of corps. They claimed to have a station in 0.0 space (PVP space where anything goes and Freeza, Beta and I try to avoid). The war that almost every player of EVE is involved occurs in 0.0 space, the thick ring of star systems that lie outside the safely patrolled galactic core (called Empire, since it is where the various EVE NPC empires are in control and PVP is not allowed unless under specific circumstances) and outside of the NPC, missions and public station areas.

My goal is to observe large chunk of gameplay Ive been missing and leave within a week or two. The politics, strategy and mechanics of operating in space where no NPCs are ever seen, every ship you encounter is human piloted, every station is owned by a real person and the battles can involve hundreds of players across multiple systems. The riches (and death) to be found there are unparalleled. My other goal was to silently observe and gather information as to who the major players are, the amount of spying and paranoia and generally to get a feel for how the war is being played. The corp I joined is in a large alliance that frequently does mercenary work for whoever pays best. I figured this would be an excellent way to gain valuable intel.

The first two hours being in the corp, I learned alot.

Tangled Web

Firstly and most importantly most of what I was told when I was recruited was either a lie or half-truths. The corp I joined was plagued by in-fighting and consists of 10 or less guys. At first I thought this would be a good way to sneak in under the radar, stay silent and not be noticed. After a while though, I realized that the people in my corp have no f***ing clue what theyre doing. All of them bicker and complain and back stab each other and most of the time theyre either mining or doing lame low-level NPC missions in the safe zones. Secondly, they have no station in 0.0 space. They operate strictly out of Empire safe zones. In fact they wanted me to stay in an NPC station in 0.7 space, which is safer than the system Freeza, Beta and I operate out of!

However I was able to learn some interesting facts about the war and all parties involved. The Myriad Alliance is one of the smaller ones that employs about 200-400 people (although only about 130 are online at any one time, Im assuming that changes during an operation) and they are at war with a mercenary alliance of similar size. They are fighting because they both want to be the top merc alliance for all the smalltime operations. Neither of them are involved in the large ops in earnest, but do participate in the major offenses when the rewards are right. Basically theyre fighting over their little back alley of the galaxy, nothing too major. I learned that they are sometimes called upon by Band of Brothers (the largest PVP corp in the game who control 55%-65% of 0.0 space) and The Coalition (attempting to stop BoB from taking control of PVP space but are smaller and frequently employ large numbers of merc corps to make up the difference). My alliance (Myriad Alliance) is trying to play both sides and ride the fence, hoping to stay neutral to both groups. I find this incredibly risky and stupid as all it would take is a suspicion of spying and BoB or The Coalition would wipe us out. Even less than 5% of BoB's total member base would be enough to drive us out or trap us in any system we base ourselves out of. Same goes for The Coalition, with the added danger of having any of their dozens of pet merc corps come after us.

In addition to this, Ive learned that the corps that make up Myriad Alliance are going to war with EACH OTHER.  I read a memo in the alliance saying that a group attacked a member corp's mining operation that belong to Myriad! There are also reports of my alliance attacking the people who employ them. Last month they destroyed a mining operation belonging to BoB while under their employ, in their home system! Myriad Alliance has done the same thing while under the employ of The Coalition. Its not smart to attack your employer in his own living room, especially when he knows you often do work for his enemy!

Also, everyone in the various alliances are paranoid to no end. With the recent destruction of a BoB station containing a Titan in their home system, everyone is suspicious of spies and double agents. Evemails for Myriad at the corporate and alliance level all say not to talk about your ship, your location, your corp, alliance or any activities in the Myriad Alliance chat channels. While this may seem a wise precaution, remember that you only have access to these chat channels if you belong to that corp or alliance. Yorue supposed to be able to trust what is said in those places. The paranoia runs so high that corps belonging to Myriad are attacking each other one on one and in medium sized gangs. Several mining operations have been destroyed by friendly corps and my own corp even hired an enemy corp to destroy an allies station so they could build one of their own in its place.

Grab N' Go

I have only been a member of this corp and the alliance it is a part of since 6pm and I have already learned enough to advise that now is not the time to join. The alliances are too paranoid and broad, sweeping changes are happening all across 0.0 space. Allies are turning on eachother, some attempting to clean house and eliminate enemy spies, large corps are splintering into small groups of "core" trusted members who take any resources with them, just to go to war with their previous members the next week. Capital ships are being destroyed at a high rate in unusual 1 on 1 encounters. It is no longer safe for cap ships to fly without escort in their own space and as a result most players are having to use battle cruiser and smaller class ships. This being the case, I am trying to acquire a Carrier and Dreadnought for Freeza and Beta respectively. Since everyone has switched from using capitol ships in large amounts and have gone to smaller class ships, cap ships should be slightly easier to get my hands on in the alliance. I am trying to get myself a Maelstrom battleship which will be even easier. I am going to try my luck and see what I can get.

However it seems that with paranoia rising and the member corps of the alliance fighting amongst themselves, I may have to leave them within a few days or risk being involved in a sort of inquisition that may follow me back to Freeza and Betaray. If I cannot get my hands on what Im looking for by Thursday, I will leave and consider the experiment a minor success.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2007, 04:30:53 AM by dm-horus »

Offline Freeza-CII

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2308
Eve Blog
« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2007, 04:10:15 AM »
Oh yes I can lol.  I have seen it in a few profiles on EVE.

"EVE its a great game played some of the biggest assholes in fictional characters."

And i bet you most of those are kids who just want to kill.  Weak people in strong ships doesnt help there personality at all.

But any way Ill add a bit in here.

In the world of Eve there are 3 ways to make money.  Mining,  Bounty hunting, and Missions.  In a Corp you may not have to do any of that just sit around and wait for the next battle.  I Find mining to be good dont have to worry to much about hostiles and you can get up and do a few things while you mine.  Unlike missions and hunting.   Mining is where the big money is at but most people cant stand the time it takes to make that money.

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2007, 04:23:45 AM »
well it depends on how you look at it. over time, mining makes the most money and resources. if you do missions you have to do alot of them to get your rating up with the agents who give them to you in order to get the good rewards. Plus you have to invest in ammunition for the combat missions and if you lose a ship you have to make up for it. Bounty hunting can get you alot of money and good standing with player corps, but it exposes you to PVP and an enemy corp could put a bounty on YOUR head too. but these methods offer you quick money and some action between paychecks, making them more appealing for those with short attention spans.

Mining is a long-term method that makes both money and valuable resources for production of items and to keep stations (and cap ship towers) fueled. It is slow and tedious but if you do it right, after a while you will start to notice your vast wealth.

And dont forget there are two more methods for making money in EVE: industry, by making items and selling them on the market and trade, by buying items for low cost, moving and selling them in high demand areas to make a profit. Trading is much slower than mining, it exposes you to attack due to the sometimes lengthy flight times and only offers a profit 50% of the time and even then its only a percentage, not even considering most of the prime areas for trade are already taken up. Industrial manufacturing is much more expensive and you would end up either having to mine anyway or buy from someone who specializes in mining.

All in all mining is the way to go, but most people either dont do it or would pay someone else to do it for them. And indeed there are more lamers getting into EVE with the more respectable players resorting to lame tactics. While this makes the EVE community look and feel more like WoW, it opens up MANY possibilities for those mature enough to bide their time and do the work.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2007, 04:33:26 AM by dm-horus »

Offline Savant 231-A

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 486
    • https://www.outpost2.net
Eve Blog
« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2007, 01:45:20 PM »
just a question.
Does EVE take a lot of bandwith?
Do you have to pay - to play?
Is it easy?
 
Gordon Freeman, and mr. Crowbar would own Master Chief in any part of the day.
"Come here citizen."

"From the ashes of the collapse we seek to build a better world for all."

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #15 on: April 03, 2007, 04:39:29 PM »
Ive filled every post with links that tell you exactly those things.

No.
Yes.
No.

Offline White Claw

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 854
Eve Blog
« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2007, 07:27:38 PM »
Wow. I don't think I have the time to invest in something of that magnitude. Sounds like it's serious business...  :o  

Offline Freeza-CII

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2308
Eve Blog
« Reply #17 on: April 03, 2007, 10:55:45 PM »
Pff its not all that serious.  I mine with a style called Jet can mining.  each canister (can) will get me about 4 to 5 mill a shot when full and i can fill one in 30 mins by myself.  There are miners that can make 500 million in a day.  I make about 20 or 30 and its always increasing.

Eve doesnt take that much bandwidth i play with 2 account on one connection and every one else on my network doesnt complain.  I have even downloaded 1 torrent while playing and there wasnt any noticalbe difference.  The only thing that does matter is the computer mostly the memory and vid card.  I have a old 128 Radeon 9000 pro and it works fine on my 3 GHZ p4 with 1 gig of ram.  My laptop which also has a 128mb vid card also from ATI has more trouble because it doesnt have as much ram only 512 with the vid card sucking 128 off that.

You have to pay to play eve but that keeps alot of the rif raff and bots out but there still plenty that pay.

Eve is pretty straight forward it just has alot of things you can do.

http://www.freeza.outpostuniverse.net/images/EVE/
some screens
« Last Edit: April 04, 2007, 03:30:51 AM by Freeza-CII »

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2007, 05:12:46 AM »
Yes, EVE can be as complicated as you want. Explaining all the possibilities makes it seem like its really serious and involved but that just shows how much depth there is available to you. For example, Freeza sits around and mines all day. Just warps to the asteroid, mines for a half hour, warps back to the stations, drops it off and does that several dozen times until he's made a fortune ;)

The requirements of EVE arent that involved. Ive run EVE on an old laptop and a computer I cobbled together from garbage parts from the LAN. Network usage is not even an issue. I played EVE when I still had 56k and I never lagged, whereas if I played OP2 the game would be like stop motion.

Of course you have to pay, and like Freeza says it keeps alot of the noobs out. You also get what you pay for in support. The devs are always good about keeping nodes running, patches occur every couple of weeks and new content is added and the universe updated every other week.

So just keep in mind that depending on how you want to play you can make it as straight forward or as complicated and convoluted as you want. In my experiments with alliances Ive seen just how *complicated* things can get, but I prefer straight-up mining and missions. Try out the free demo. I have the link in the first post in the thread. Come find us and we will get you started right away.

Offline Savant 231-A

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 486
    • https://www.outpost2.net
Eve Blog
« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2007, 06:28:20 AM »
Quote
Who is interested to try the EVE trial account and join our corp.
I can't promise... But i'l see what i can do.

If i even come, do not expect me to come with some huge ship. I love small ships.

Quote
Betaray, Freeza and I are piloting some of the largest ships in the game with powerful weapons after about 2 months of play. Freeza has accumulated more than 50 skills in that time.


I want to see the pic of it or info about it.
 
« Last Edit: April 04, 2007, 12:09:48 PM by Savant 231-A »
Gordon Freeman, and mr. Crowbar would own Master Chief in any part of the day.
"Come here citizen."

"From the ashes of the collapse we seek to build a better world for all."

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2007, 07:21:04 AM »
Well it would take you months to get a "big ship" even if you had someone mining for you. You do not choose your ship when you enter the game, you have to EARN it and that takes time. It has taken us months to get our moderately-sized ships. Sticking with smaller classes is smart for tactical reasons and expense reasons. Good choice for combat but eventually youll have to learn how to use larger vessels for mining, hauling and defense.

Offline Savant 231-A

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 486
    • https://www.outpost2.net
Eve Blog
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2007, 12:00:40 PM »
You sound like an EVE expert lol.

EDIT:
Quote
Well it would take you months to get a "big ship" even if you had someone mining for you.

Now i got a crazy idea. Since you got "moderatly" big ships, try to contact some other companies that mine-on-large and offer them protection, and for return they pay YOU money.
I hope this help :P
« Last Edit: April 04, 2007, 12:04:48 PM by Savant 231-A »
Gordon Freeman, and mr. Crowbar would own Master Chief in any part of the day.
"Come here citizen."

"From the ashes of the collapse we seek to build a better world for all."

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #22 on: April 05, 2007, 01:46:27 AM »
Savant, thats one of the methods that alot of people use in EVE. There are large privateer and police corps that will do whatever you want so long as you pay them well. Usually you do something like that if youre into combat since the money you make is usually only enough to cover the expenses of the job, like buying ammo. If you charge too much for your services nobody will hire you and the amount you would need to support a corp by that method would be more than anyone is willing to spend.

Offline Freeza-CII

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2308
Eve Blog
« Reply #23 on: April 05, 2007, 04:20:14 AM »
Small ships like frigates are easy kills sure there fast but they cant take a beating Destroyers and Cruisers are still small compared to the Battle cruiser and Battle ship.  Can take more of a beating and deal out more damage then any frigate could ever do.

Battle Cruisers are pretty easy to get to only takes about a week to a week and a half to get to.  Theses range from 30 millio to 50 million isk.  A Battle ship would take about a 3 weeks plus the times to get the money for the damn thing, around 150 million isk.

The idea of contracting ourselves out to other corps to protect miners would never work as mining is the life blood of any corp.  So they protect them pretty good or have them mine in the high security sectors where a miner can literally mine for months with out any trouble.  Not to mention that they have several miners and there is no way you can protect them all unless you a moderate size corp that is in a aliance with the corp that is needing the protection.

If you want to see how many skill I have Ill get a screen of it.

http://www.freeza.outpostuniverse.net/images/EVE/

It will be the last one in the list.  That is how many i have about about 2 and half months
« Last Edit: April 05, 2007, 04:31:27 AM by Freeza-CII »

Offline dm-horus

  • Banned
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1042
Eve Blog
« Reply #24 on: April 05, 2007, 07:17:28 AM »
Now I see what you meant on IRC :P Yeah when I said you had more than 50 skills I got your stats confused with mine. I just passed 60 skills and I typed that up at 2AM, so I was kinda out of it. I was just too lazy to go back and correct it.

To give you an idea, I was out for 1 whole month while Beta and Freeza continued to play. I lost 1 month of skill training. But since I have come back to EVE I have trained 20 new skills and brought all but 4 of them up to lvl3. If you manage your time properly you can get alot done in very short order.

A trick that Ive learned is to get all the skills you need and want and train each of them up to lvl3. Then once all of them are up to at least that level, go down the list one-by-one and get them to lvl5 (max). This way youre getting yourself up to a moderate strength in those areas before you start the 3 week long skill training sessions. Invest in getting all your learning skills up to lvl5 in the beginning and things will move fast.