Author Topic: Motivational quote ;)  (Read 90 times)

Offline Hooman

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Motivational quote ;)
« on: November 14, 2017, 03:07:53 AM »
How's this for a motivational quote?
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Motivation and needing someone to kick your ass is a beginner mindset.

This goes along nicely with research that suggests motivation comes after you put in the hard work on something, rather than being the cause of it. Momentum creates motivation, not the other way around. Also why motivational speeches and seminars are kind of ridiculous. They're often more about feeling good than actually accomplishing something.


Also related to motivation (and discipline):
Quote from: James Clear
Amateurs do things when itís easy ó when they feel motivated to do them. Professionals do things on a schedule.

How many of you are thinking of scheduling something important now? Yeah, "thinking". Is that just motivation? ;)

Offline lordpalandus

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Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2017, 12:41:02 PM »
How does this take into consider demotivating factors? Sometimes people do have tons of positive motivation, but have far more negative motivation, to counter it.

Things like: "I want to embark on creating an ambitious open world game, with no experience." But, they are demotivated by friends and family around them telling them they can't do it, or they only have enough money in their bank account for 6 months of solid development time, or their girlfriend tells them that if they spend all that time on the game, then she'll leave you.

How does one overcome those negative demotivating factors, and remain positively motivated?

I think a lot of these motivational speeches only ever focus on the positives, and never really address the negative demotivational things or how one is supposed to manage them, which are often the cause of derailing projects or stopping projects altogether. In the real world, there is an opportunity cost to any activity, and that means sacrifices must be made to do an activity. Two serious demotivating things that kill projects, is the feeling that you can't do what you want because you are constantly confused, and the feeling that you can't seek help because you don't know the problem and is constantly frustrating. It is after all, what derailed my Outpost 2 like game, and led me to create my text adventure instead, which I'm having a much greater level of success at.

So in the example above, if the person was willing to distance themselves from their friends and family, was willing to go on social assistance/welfare and live a very poor/unhealthy life, was willing to be alone and without a girlfriend, then they could likely keep themselves motivated to see the project through to the end; after all, where there is the will, there is a way. However, realistically, who would inflict that sort of personal hell upon themselves?

Thoughts?
« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 12:43:02 PM by lordpalandus »
Currently working on Cataclysm of Chaos.

Offline dave_erald

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Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2017, 01:35:22 PM »
Training is nothing. Will is everything.

The will to act
I wrote a novella on this site, I can sorta code...

Outpost2 - Life at the End- 2015
Edits will show up in red

- David R.V.

Offline Zhall

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Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2017, 04:34:34 PM »
Taking action trumps everything.

Even if you have no idea what you are doing, if you take action, something will get done.
Pumping out awsome.

Offline Hooman

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Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2017, 03:13:55 AM »
Ok, sorry I haven't gotten to this sooner. There's a lot to unpack here.

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How does this take into consider demotivating factors? Sometimes people do have tons of positive motivation, but have far more negative motivation, to counter it.

That's kind of my point. It doesn't matter. Or rather, it shouldn't. Not if you have the right mindset. Motivation comes and goes. If you rely on it always being there, you're in trouble. People don't need motivation to achieve big goals, they need discipline.

The danger though, is that most people think they're disciplined, even if they're not. It's easy to think great things about yourself. And if you've been feeling motivated, and been sticking to something every day, it's easy to feel disciplined about it. But what about when you don't feel so great? When you want to sleep in, take naps, goof off, do something else. Do you have a system in place for getting back on track? Discipline only counts when you need it.

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How does one overcome those negative demotivating factors, and remain positively motivated?

How do you overcome them? ... you overcome them. What kind of answer do you expect here? A detailed action plan? Or someone to tell you you're a special snowflake and that your problems really are insurmountable, and you should just give up? It's not about overcoming how you feel, or becoming motivated. You accept that you might feel like crap, and just do your shit anyway.

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I think a lot of these motivational speeches only ever focus on the positives, and never really address the negative demotivational things or how one is supposed to manage them, which are often the cause of derailing projects or stopping projects altogether.

Yes, you're right. That's one of the reasons why I find motivational speeches to be a waste of time. Everyone's situation is unique, and no general advice can be given that's still actionable. It's your responsibility to figure out your own problems. The people who most often complain about lack of actionable advice are often the ones who don't put in the effort to ask a specific question. They fail to take responsibility for their own problems. They want someone else to just come solve all their problems and tell them exactly what to do. If someone wants actionable advice, they need to ask specific detailed questions.

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In the real world, there is an opportunity cost to any activity, and that means sacrifices must be made to do an activity.

Yes, very true. Priorities are important. Obsessing over benefits, while ignoring the costs, is likely to lead to bad decisions.

Related: Two of the biggest problems in life are giving up to early, and not giving up soon enough. Nice broad generalization. Not exactly helpful actionable advice, is it? ;) You still have to figure out when each one applies to your own situation. You also have to bear the consequences of it.

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Two serious demotivating things that kill projects, is the feeling that you can't do what you want because you are constantly confused, and the feeling that you can't seek help because you don't know the problem and is constantly frustrating.

Yes! I've experienced this before, and it was the most frustrating experience ever. It was an awful generalized feeling of confusion and frustration, without any clear cause. It just felt like everything was wrong. It took me years to really fully articulate why I had felt that way.

Not too sure what to suggest here. One piece of advice I heard was, when you feel these intense emotions, to lean in, and listen to what they're trying to tell you. Great, but what exactly does "lean in" mean? Nice piece of broad advice, which of course is unfortunately not very actionable.

In your case, it sounds like there is a gap in your technical knowledge somewhere. The question then is what, and how do you learn it.

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Things like: "I want to embark on creating an ambitious open world game, with no experience." But, they are demotivated by friends and family around them telling them they can't do it, or they only have enough money in their bank account for 6 months of solid development time, or their girlfriend tells them that if they spend all that time on the game, then she'll leave you.

...

So in the example above, if the person was willing to distance themselves from their friends and family, was willing to go on social assistance/welfare and live a very poor/unhealthy life, was willing to be alone and without a girlfriend, then they could likely keep themselves motivated to see the project through to the end; after all, where there is the will, there is a way. However, realistically, who would inflict that sort of personal hell upon themselves?

Now this is getting fairly specific.

Ok, so... disown your family, leave your girlfriend, dump all your friends, and go live on welfare! Just kidding. Don't do that. Seriously, don't.

Sounds like you have a bunch of people, who should reasonable care about you, trying to tell you something, that you don't want to listen to. Maybe you should put aside your feelings for a moment and listen to what they're saying. Why are they saying it? Maybe you should do what they suggest.

You might also want to re-read what you wrote, and ask yourself if that really sounds "motivating". Do you really believe someone is going to do their best work in that environment?

Also consider if you have any deep invisible fears you are avoiding by not following their advice. For instance, getting a job can be scary and uncomfortable. Maybe you're really just trying to delay or avoid this discomfort.

My advice: Get a job. 1) Having gainful employment can do wonders for your mood. 2) Having the extra income and security will greatly increase your chance of success in your own endeavour.

People who claim you have to go "all in" to be successful are foolish and dumb. What they say is not true. Don't listen to their flawed advice. People who hold regular jobs while developing a business on the side have a much greater chance of success than those who go all in. Going all in can lead to short term thinking, and reduced ability to take risks where they are needed the most. Business involves risk. Successful business invovles risk mitigation. Having a steady income you can live off out, outside the success of your endeavor, will mitigate a huge amount of risk.

If your project is important to you, you will find the time, even with the demands of a full time job. Plus, the restriction in time forces you to focus on the areas that really matter. If you have too much time available, you tend to develop wasteful habits, trying to squeeze results out of areas that really aren't worth it. Go for the big wins.

Disclaimer: I often don't follow my own advice. Much to my detriment. :/



Quote from: dave_erald
Training is nothing. Will is everything.
To this I might counter with:
Quote
Under pressure, you don't rise to the occasion, you sink to the level of your training
:P

Quote from: Zhall
Even if you have no idea what you are doing, if you take action, something will get done.
Indeed. At the very least, you're likely to learn a lot more from the attempt, than simply reading about it.