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21
General Interest / Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Last post by leeor_net on December 05, 2017, 09:24:18 PM »
Question: As Hooman mentioned above about getting a job and working on the project on the side, and saying that it could be done. So, my question is, now that you have a full-time job again, how is Outpost HD going? Do you feel like you are getting anywhere, or feel the creative urge to work on it? Or are you so tired from the full-time job that you are not able to find any creative energy left to work on Outpost HD, despite it being something you'd like to do? I'm curious at what your response would be.

I haven't made any progress on OPHD since I started my job. Mostly because I've been distracting myself with the game Haven and Hearth (though its novelty is starting to wear off). Mostly I've just been trying to distract myself from reality at all for real life issues that I don't really want to discuss but suffice it to say that the urge to develop is getting hard to ignore now. :)

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People have limited creative energy, and full-time jobs demand the best of that creative energy, leaving little to none afterwards. If the project in question is something more menial-labor (ie kitchen renovations) or purely mental (ie doing a school course) it can often be done, but creating a video game is a completely different matter
I think you have a few assumptions here that need to be challenged.

Going to challenge it right now.

It comes down to time management, something I'm personally not very good at. But that's basically it. For me I needed to distract myself for awhile while I was settling into my new position (and dealing with illness and family matters). Now that that's pretty much in the past, sure, I have a full time job. But that's only 40 hours out of my week. There's at least another 60 waking hours, more if I'm really dedicated, that I can spend at least part of it on my project.

E.g., if I spent only 10 hours a week working on OutpostHD, it would probably already be done. 10 actual hours of actual development (and not putzing around distracting myself with youtube and artwork that I don't really need to be dealing with) is a lot of time and very easy for anybody to give -- think of it, just an hour a day after work for 5 days and then 5 more hours on your weekend, say three hours one day, two hours the next. Done. Generally speaking when I'm on a development kick I spend as much as 10 hours a day working on my projects (on the weekends anyway).
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Game Discussion General / Re: Cataclysm of Chaos V8
« Last post by Hooman on December 05, 2017, 09:16:05 PM »
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Alchemy is feature creep. I dunno, but it does seem like crafting seems to creep into pretty much every game these days, and I'm unsure if the game would benefit from a crafting system, or if my current ways of providing progress to players is sufficient. Thoughts?

Would adding it make the game substantially more fun?

Mind you, not a little more fun, but substantially more fun. Is the implementation cost justified. Also, this isn't about checking off boxes to provide more features. Sometimes limiting features to make something more focused is better. Having too many confusing options can detract from fun.
23
General Interest / Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Last post by Hooman on December 05, 2017, 09:10:34 PM »
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On the surface discipline appears to be something of its own, but in reality it is just a way for a person to self-motivate themselves, generally by using a negative demotivator, as a positive motivator; ie "I have to get this done, or my boss will kill me", or "I've been ordered to run into no mans land, and if I don't I'll be ridiculed by my fellows or court-martialed for disobeying a direct order", or "If I don't complete this project in two weeks time, I'm going to go bankrupt and have to abandon the project." Discipline in reality, is simply using "fear-tactics" to get you to complete a task, when the alternative of not completing the task will often result in a worse outcome.

Incorrect. Discipline is orthogonal to both motivation and fear. Granted, consequences are very strongly tied to discipline. For a more positive sense of discipline, consider someone who has a sense of the kind of person they want to be, and making conscious decisions to move towards that, regardless of motivation or fear.

Consider the subtle difference between "I have to go to the gym, otherwise I'll be a fat lazy slob, and nobody will love me", versus, "I should go to the gym, because I want to be the kind of person that takes care of my health". I would argue the first is more about fear and being compelled by external forces, while the later is more about discipline and conscious choice. I would also expect the first option to have a much lower rate of compliance than the second option.

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Also, discipline doesn't really help you when you are creative energy bankrupt; I've tried, it doesn't work; by bankrupt I mean, my brain aches so hard that it feels like someone clubbed me upside the head, my eyes feel like they are about to fall out of my head, and trying to form even a simple sentence, in a conversation feels like I'm trying to force a migraine upon myself.

Part of discipline is knowing how you function, and making a plan around that, rather than trying to force yourself on sheer willpower alone. It might very well be the proper thing to do is get some rest, get some exercise, eat well, take care of your social life, and then get back to work once that's all been handled. It's not about deprivation. I would argue that if you're constantly making short term decisions, you are being undisciplined. Working 7 days a week is not disciplined. If you can only be productive for 2 hours a day, then set aside 2 hours a day and stick to it. Trying to force 3 hours a day is not being more disciplined.

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Easier said than done. I find that analyzing and bugfinding logical things or syntax comes easily for me, but trying to understand ones own emotions, is a completely different ball game.

Agreed 100%.

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However with that said, if you feel that you can accomplish such a task, then it might be a good idea to distance yourself from people who are against you and surround yourself with people that will support you... well, without of course creating an echo chamber, where people will just tell you what you want to hear. Its complicated.

Yes, exactly. Stay away from people who bring you down with no cause, but don't be blind to good advice just because it's not what you want to hear. You need to consider where the advice is coming from. The advice might say more about the fears and insecurities of the person giving the advice than anything about you.

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there are some who don't think I can accomplish the task of creating a game and are actively trying to discourage me from making a game

"Concern Trolls"
Some people feel threatened by someone else taking on a big project, which might make them feel insecure about their own meagre accomplishments. They may often try to discourage you by listing all the possible problems, why it won't work, why it will be hard, why it won't be useful, why nobody will care. Really it's often their own ego talking. They don't want you to succeed because they might feel jealous or otherwise under accomplished.

Contrast this with people who genuinely care about you, and don't want to see you get hurt. Parents are often guilty of displaying concern in such a way that it discourages people from trying. This can also be unhealthy. Maybe a business venture is a good idea, but there being risk, you might feel bad afterwards if by chance it doesn't work out. This isn't so much concern over no reasonable upside, or lost money, as the emotional after effects, which parents often try to shield you from. They might say things like "well, don't get your hopes up", or "don't worry if it doesn't work out". It's well meaning, but not entirely healthy.

Of course the advice might be that they really do think you'll fail, and that it will cost you, and you would be better off doing something else. Like say, "I don't think you should pay to become a member of that company, it's a pyramid scheme".

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Sometimes you must make sacrifices to see your dreams become reality, and as such, sometimes life has to suck for a while until you can get to the place you want to be.

Sometimes is not always. Be careful about this one. You may simply be justifying something that doesn't need to happen. It's quite possible to make many dreams a reality without heavy sacrifices. Don't go believing you have to sacrifice something important to get what you want.

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I'm not much of a team player, unless I'm the leader. And as my greatest working peeve, is being under an incompetent leader, I have never enjoyed doing paid work, unless I was able to set my own pace and set my own high quality of standards. I find that I actually find the greatest leaders, in volunteer positions, and as such I've greatly enjoyed doing volunteer work. So... right now I'm volunteering at the Salvation Army, weekly, while I work on the game. I find that making the game fulfills my personal pursuit of career goals, while the volunteering helps me to do a service for people and feel like I'm actually accomplishing something. In a paid job though, I doubt I'd feel the same, and if I did take on a paid job, I'd have to sacrifice game development time and volunteer hours... which honestly are what is keeping my mood up these days.

Woah. Ok, sounds like you have some control issues. You may have experienced incompetent leaders, though you might also be facing issues caused by your own insecurities or defensiveness. It also sounds like you believe all forms of paid work have incompetent leaders. I'd suggest you don't have sufficient life experience to support such a claim. How many jobs are there on the planet? How many jobs have you held? Small sample sizes may not be indicative of the whole. Chances are, you can find paid work, with good leadership.

You might be right that committing your time to doing something meaningful is keeping your mood up. Though that's also one reason why having a job can also be a good thing. Depression and joblessness are correlated. Maybe you just haven't found the right job yet. Maybe there is something useful you can do, and also get paid for. Actually, getting paid for something is generally a pretty good sign of it being useful. (Jokes about the government sector aside).

You might also find that having more to do makes you accomplish more. I found I was most productive on my hobby projects when I had a heavy academic load keeping me busy. The instant I went on vacation between semesters, my productivity on hobby projects would often grind to a halt. It's often not so much about time as it is about energy, and certain activities such as school or work can actually give you energy. It can also give you a nice sense of accomplishment, and a feeling that you can do other things successfully.

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If someone who has the qualifications, and the experience to do a job isn't finding a job in his field, what chance do I have finding a job I'll like in my own field?

Irrelevant. Also a very common excuse, though nonetheless an excuse. It's a way people use to justify not taking action. Often there is fear involved in taking action, and people use this as an excuse to avoid that fear.

...

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I hate interviews and I hate even more when you never get contacted from them again. Its a part of my life that I've put behind me and I have no interest whatsoever in getting a job, unless I'm absolutely forced to. I don't do well in positions, where I'm micromanaged or put on a team, with team expectations

Exactly. This sounds very much like fear of rejection. You're avoiding what makes you uncomfortable. Now why does it make you so uncomfortable? And don't stop at the surface level reasons, keep asking why of each reason.

You have made up a story to justify not taking action. But how do you know your conclusions are correct? What basis were these conclusions drawn on? Are these really absolutes? Are there any counterexamples? How might you disprove some of these beliefs?

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team work is optional though. Most jobs, that isn't the case. So, unless I'm the leader in a paid environment, I don't think I'll cope to well with the stress. And I can only be the leader in a work environment, as a sole proprietor, which is why I'm on the path that I am, with my career.

Really? Why? Is this really the only way? Be mindful of absolutes.

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Running a business requires dedication and hard work, and if your time and energy is split between a day job and the business, generally both will suffer. That's why successful entrepreneurs will tell you to go all in; having the money from the day job can be good for finances, but its killer on motivation levels, stress levels, and energy levels.

Nonsense. Many businesses start out as part-time side hustles. People are often excited to work on their personal project after work, and may actually have more energy because the project excites them. Others may carve time out before work, by adjusting sleep and wake hours. Some people just do their own thing on the weekend. It all depends on the person. A side business does not need to be all consuming. And neither does a day job.

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Yes, you can find the time to work on a project between a full-time job, but that leads to very quick burnout and doesn't work too well on creative projects.

Burnout comes more from lack of boundaries than from having a lot of work to do. If it's fullfilling work, which you are excited about, it might be perfectly fine to work long hours for extended periods of time, so long as you're not neglecting certain other things.

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People have limited creative energy, and full-time jobs demand the best of that creative energy, leaving little to none afterwards. If the project in question is something more menial-labor (ie kitchen renovations) or purely mental (ie doing a school course) it can often be done, but creating a video game is a completely different matter

I think you have a few assumptions here that need to be challenged.
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General Interest / Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Last post by lordpalandus on December 05, 2017, 06:52:46 PM »
Yes.

Previous experience is important, to an extent. Some projects can be done with no experience, others requires a ton.

Yes practicing ones craft is important, to the point where you can handle the special projects. I liken it to stepping stones; you must take each step deliberately, and complete them, so that you can take the next step as well.

Very true, on the painter.

Its similar, yes.

Technically, you can do the same for other things, like painting or sculpting, its just that it is prohibitively expensive.

Also, it is expensive to have to redo sections of code as well. If you designed and coded it properly from the start, it would take you significantly less time to build it. Yes, coding is an iterative process, but, you can iteratively design it out on paper, determine the logic needed beforehand, and figure out how the code is going to interact with eachother, before writing a single line of code; I know it can be done as, I've done it with smaller-scale prototypes; larger projects would just require more time on paper to figure things out. I figured out beforehand precisely how I wanted it to work on paper, and then wrote the code in Quest, and it functioned precisely as I had designed it to, without fail.
25
General Interest / Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Last post by Vagabond on December 05, 2017, 06:17:50 PM »
Hmm,

Does anyone feel like making a game is similar to being a craftsman?

What I mean is that if you want to be a sculptor, you cannot continue chipping away at the same piece of marble forever and make it a masterpiece. An amount of previous experience is required with planning to finish a project properly.

So you need to make practice works and other projects over time to build your craft to a point where you can handle the special project you have in mind.

A painter cannot sit down and paint a beautiful picture without hundreds of previous drawings and paintings to rely on, no matter how long he/she sits and stares at the canvas or careful he/she is with each brush stroke?

Maybe it is similar when making a computer game (or software?).

Except you actually can rewrite sections of your software. hmmm.

-Brett
26
Outpost 2 Update / Re: Allowing Outpost2 to load any vol file (*.vol)
« Last post by Vagabond on December 05, 2017, 06:10:06 PM »
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First, what is the benefit of making it a class?

It has several functions that should not be called by code external to ipDropDown.cpp

BOOL __stdcall EnableWindowNew(HWND hWnd, BOOL bEnable);
unsigned long __stdcall inet_addrNew(const char* cp);
void WriteAddressesToIniFile();

Okay, so this is only sort of true, because I think inet_addrNew and EnableWindowNew get injected into Outpost2's memory. I'm guessing they shouldn't be encapsulated. However, I inet_addrNew should be separated into several more private functions since it is almost 50 lines long and handles all the sorting when new IP addresses are noted.

Also, it has member variables that should only be updated by ipDropDown.cpp. In particular:

char ipStrings[10][47];
int numIpStrings = 0;

So, I'm not really sure the right way forward reconciling the fact that ipDropDown manipulates Outpost2's memory but also contains functions and variables that should be encapsulated. Again though, this can just be left alone for now too. It works and is fairly organized.

If we move the declaration of a function or a variable to the .cpp file, is this considered encapsulated? It might be a nice alternative. Since the rest of op2ext doesn't need to call WriteAddressesToIniFile, we could move its declaration to the .cpp file. Would this be a positive move?



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This would not break binary compatibility. Existing compiled code would continue to run. This could break source code compatibility, if they are requiring public.h and the file disappears. Though that is an easy fix, updated the #include line, so in practice not a big concern.

In this case, I'd like to move the version to 2.0.0 on this release since it would be a breaking change for source code compatibility. I'd also like to leave some wiggle room in case someone ever wants to go back and assign version numbers to previous releases that I/we? don't really have enough documentation on right now.



I finished a rewrite of the ReadMe. Please let me know if there are any mistakes or if it is too detailed, not detailed enough, etc. I'd like to take a final pass reviewing it once everything else is completed anyways. It is in the repo, but below is a copy for ease of access.

Code: [Select]
Outpost 2 Extension Module
------------------------------------------

Outpost 2 extension modules (op2ext) is used to implement various extensions to the game Outpost 2. The most current version of Outpost 2 is maintained by the Outpost 2 community and may be found at https://www.outpost2.net/.

Authors: op2hacker (aka BlackBox)
         Hooman
         Arklon
         Brett208 (Vagabond)

Summary
------------------------------------------

Outpost 2 Extension is a dynamic link (DLL) library written in C++. Source code may be found at https://github.com/OutpostUniverse/op2ext. OP2Ext compiles against x86 Windows. The current solution/project files use Visual Studio.

The following extensions are implemented for Outpost 2:

 * Addon a single module using the command line argument /loadmod

    - Allows for modifying the behavior of Outpost 2 by placing modified files in a folder and calling '/loadmod directoryName' when executing Outpost 2. For example, Outpost2.exe /loadmod multitek2.
    - Designed for modules the user wants to include in Outpost 2 sometimes, but not on a semi-permanent basis.

 * Addon modules using ini file

    - Allows for adding modules to Outpost 2 without calling a command line switch.
    - Allows setting properties for modules in the Outpost2.ini file.
    - Designed for modules the user wants to include in Outpost 2 on a permanent or semi-permanent basis.

 * Extra VOL file loading

    - Allows loading any vol file contained in the root Outpost 2 directory and in the mod folder.
    - Outpost 2 may only load a maximum of 31 vol files, including vol files loaded by modules.

 * IP dropdown box for net play

    - Allows saving previously used IP address in a drop down menu for easy selection when joining repeat matches.


Writing Custom Modules
------------------------------------------
op2ext.dll is included in releases of Outpost 2 on Outpost Universe. This allows modules to be written and integrated into anyone's copy of Outpost 2. Custom modules must be designed to hook into op2ext.dll through functions that export using the C Application Binary Interface (ABI). See modlibrary.c for a basic template.

Each new module for Outpost 2 should be placed in a separate directory that resides in the root directory of Outpost 2. The module should be designed to interface with Outpost 2 by either being added as an argument to the command line when opening Outpost 2 or by being specified in the Outpost2.ini file.

If the module contains configurable settings, history, or other data, and it is designed to be loaded through the Outpost2.ini file, it should store those settings in the Outpost2.ini file

Available functions for a module to export to op2ext.dll (see modlibrary.c of details):

 - mod_init()
 - mod_run()
 - mod_destroy()

op2ext also provides the following functions for use by the custom module (see public.h for details):

 - void GetCurrentModDir_s(char* buffer, int bufferSize);
 - [DEPRECATED] char* GetCurrentModDir();
 - void GetGameDir(char* buffer);
 - void AddVolToList(char* volName);
 - void SetSerialNumber(char major, char minor, char revision);


Module Serial Numbers
------------------------------------------
Outpost 2 contains an internal serial number that is used during multiplayer to ensure both the host's and guest's copies of Outpost 2 are compatible. This check occurs when the guest initially joins the match's chatroom. If the copies are not compatible, the guest will be immediately booted, and the 2 incompatible version numbers are listed for reference.

When an Outpost 2 module affects part of the game that could cause problems during multiplayer matches, the module must change the internal serial number with the function SetSerialNumber. This will prevent someone from joining the match that does not have the mod and possibly causing crashing bugs.

The serial number is represented by three single digit numbers (0-9). Serials 0.0.0 to 0.9.9 are reserved for new modules affecting multiplayer.

Using SetSerialNumber does not change the in game serial number listed in Outpost 2 under the about section.

 
Vol Files
------------------------------------------
Vol files are a custom Outpost 2 storage format used to store in game files like maps, tech trees, tile sets (wells), etc. Editing vol files requires custom software. See the Outpost 2 mapper or OP2Archive (https://github.com/OutpostUniverse/OP2Archive) for vol file manipulation.

Vol files must be loaded into Outpost 2 before the game initializes. A module should accomplish this by adding vol files to Outpost 2 within the function mod_init by calling AddVolToList.

Outpost 2 only supports 31 vol files. If loading more than 31 vol files is requested, op2ext will not load any vol file past 31 and will warn the user on which vol files were not loaded. Outpost 2 will continue to load, but depending on what data was contained in the discarded vol file(s), the program may or may not be able to function normally.


Change Log
------------------------------------------

Version 2.0.0

 * Add ability to load vol files with any name into Outpost 2.
 * Deprecated function GetGameDir(char* buffer).
 * Allow retrieving data from Outpost2.ini greater in size than 1024 characters.
 * Improve error messages when Outpost 2 has difficulty loading a module or vol files.

Version 1.0.0

 * Several releases of op2ext were made prior to 2.0.0 which are not currently documented.



My work on Outpost 2 is currently getting crowded out with other priorities. I wouldn't expect more than some minor lifting on my part until some time in January. Sorry guys. This just took longer than I had available. (Probably because I kept working on random parts of op2ext not related to loading any vol file... but oh well).

-Brett
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Projects / Re: OP2 Map Imager (Variable scaled renders of Outpost 2 Maps)
« Last post by Vagabond on December 05, 2017, 05:39:26 PM »
leeor,

Thanks,

The wiki page has already been updated as you suggested. OP2Archive also points to GitHub for newer release copies.

https://wiki.outpost2.net/doku.php?id=outpost_2:helper_programs:map_imager

-Brett
28
General Interest / Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Last post by lordpalandus on December 05, 2017, 04:36:15 PM »
@Hooman;

On the surface discipline appears to be something of its own, but in reality it is just a way for a person to self-motivate themselves, generally by using a negative demotivator, as a positive motivator; ie "I have to get this done, or my boss will kill me", or "I've been ordered to run into no mans land, and if I don't I'll be ridiculed by my fellows or court-martialed for disobeying a direct order", or "If I don't complete this project in two weeks time, I'm going to go bankrupt and have to abandon the project." Discipline in reality, is simply using "fear-tactics" to get you to complete a task, when the alternative of not completing the task will often result in a worse outcome. Using fear as a motivator, is a great short-term tool for accomplishing a task you don't want to, but its not an ideal motivator in the long-run as it will result in extreme stress and eventual burnout. Also, discipline doesn't really help you when you are creative energy bankrupt; I've tried, it doesn't work; by bankrupt I mean, my brain aches so hard that it feels like someone clubbed me upside the head, my eyes feel like they are about to fall out of my head, and trying to form even a simple sentence, in a conversation feels like I'm trying to force a migraine upon myself.

The ideal sustaining motivator is self empowerment or self encouragement; not things easily learned however, but far more effective than sheer discipline. As they aren't easily learned, people will regularly fallback on discipline to accomplish tasks, as discipline is easier to learn and is easier to teach. Doesn't mean its better, just easier to acquire.

Of course you solve demotivating factors by solving them. But that doesn't explain how you achieve such a thing. What process do you use to overcome it? What resources at your disposal to you use to problem solve it? I'm looking for processes, procedures, methods, etc... You talk about making things actionable... how do you put into action ways of overcoming problems?

A very good point = "If someone wants actionable advice, they need to ask specific detailed questions."

Self-Analysis goes a long way into making in actionable. Self-analyze if the project you are working on is a turd, and if it is, abandon it. If it isn't, keep working at it. Problem is, particularly for coders is the desire to create a prototype, and then just refactor it. Prototypes are great for testing out ideas, problem solving issues, or producing proof of concepts, but they are not ideal for making a solid foundation for a program and should be tossed out, and restarted from scratch. I've learned that prototyping is great when it is used in the appropriate manner, and have also learned that creating a prototype and then building other stuff ontop of it isn't ideal either; hence why my monster description system is taking so long to address.

Easier said than done. I find that analyzing and bugfinding logical things or syntax comes easily for me, but trying to understand ones own emotions, is a completely different ball game. Some people do not have the mental capacity to accomplish such a task. I can analyze my emotions and have a rough way of solving them, but it takes a significant amount of time to do so; if it takes me 2 hours to find and solve a complex syntax problem in my game, solving a very complex mess of emotions can take anywhere from 2 weeks to 2 years. And unfortunately, there isn't many resources out there that a guy can use to better problem solve their own emotions. As emotions are based more on fuzzy logic and intuition, rather than on hard facts or rules, its very hard to go about solving them.

And yes it is a technical knowledge issue; I've already solved that one... even if it did take me about 14 months to do so >.> and I have a plan in place to acquire that technical knowledge so that I don't run into the same issues as before.

Self-Analysis comes in handy here again. Some people are overly negative, or pessimistic, and will actively try to sabotage other people, whereas some people are more rationally centered and are realists, and are trying to dissuade you from doing a task that they don't think you can achieve. Doesn't mean you can't achieve it, its just that these types of people are not going to be of much help to you. Now, if you have people around you that are knowledgeable in the tasks at hand and have gone through similar things as you, it might be wise to listen to them. It all depends on the type of people you surround yourself with.

However with that said, if you feel that you can accomplish such a task, then it might be a good idea to distance yourself from people who are against you and surround yourself with people that will support you... well, without of course creating an echo chamber, where people will just tell you what you want to hear. Its complicated.

EDIT: However, I will be the first to admit that there are people on the forum here that have provided a lot of useful advice that I have not heeded, to my own detriment. People, like yourself, or leeor. Sometimes my vanity gets in the way of listening, and its something I'm working on.

As for me, there are people that do deeply care for me, but I'm getting mixed signals. Most of them fully support me in my pursuit of creating games but at the same time will tell me when I effed up, but at the same time, there are some who don't think I can accomplish the task of creating a game and are actively trying to discourage me from making a game. So when say people on this forum give me advice, I'm unsure of if they are trying to encourage me or discourage me from making a game, and thus I'm unable to determine if I should listen to them, take what they have to say with a grain of salt, or ignore them. Its complicated.

Well back to the discipline discussion; do you really think someone who is forcing themselves to do a task is going to be doing their best work in that environment either? Sometimes you must make sacrifices to see your dreams become reality, and as such, sometimes life has to suck for a while until you can get to the place you want to be.

I'm not much of a team player, unless I'm the leader. And as my greatest working peeve, is being under an incompetent leader, I have never enjoyed doing paid work, unless I was able to set my own pace and set my own high quality of standards. I find that I actually find the greatest leaders, in volunteer positions, and as such I've greatly enjoyed doing volunteer work. So... right now I'm volunteering at the Salvation Army, weekly, while I work on the game. I find that making the game fulfills my personal pursuit of career goals, while the volunteering helps me to do a service for people and feel like I'm actually accomplishing something. In a paid job though, I doubt I'd feel the same, and if I did take on a paid job, I'd have to sacrifice game development time and volunteer hours... which honestly are what is keeping my mood up these days.

The other reason is I have a friend who is a pretty good programmer, and has a bachelors in computer science. He has tons of experience in a wide variety of languages. However, he hasn't been able to find any programming work for the past 2 years now, and has had to do hard labor jobs instead, like laborer or painting or cleaning work. He has the qualifications, and has the experience, but yet, has gone through about 5 interviews in the past three months, all of which he felt pretty good of, and he got none of them. If someone who has the qualifications, and the experience to do a job isn't finding a job in his field, what chance do I have finding a job I'll like in my own field? I hate interviews and I hate even more when you never get contacted from them again. Its a part of my life that I've put behind me and I have no interest whatsoever in getting a job, unless I'm absolutely forced to. I don't do well in positions, where I'm micromanaged or put on a team, with team expectations; I do well with my volunteer work because, I'm not micromanaged, and the tasks I do, do not require team work; you pack orders yourself and bring them out yourself; team work is optional though. Most jobs, that isn't the case. So, unless I'm the leader in a paid environment, I don't think I'll cope to well with the stress. And I can only be the leader in a work environment, as a sole proprietor, which is why I'm on the path that I am, with my career. I also find interviews to be extremely stressful, to the point where I do not achieve anything creative until I find out that I got the job or not.

Sound advice, but as mentioned above, isn't super applicable to me.

Business does involve risk, and those who don't spend the amount of time necessary to keep it running, will find themselves out of business. Running a business requires dedication and hard work, and if your time and energy is split between a day job and the business, generally both will suffer. That's why successful entrepreneurs will tell you to go all in; having the money from the day job can be good for finances, but its killer on motivation levels, stress levels, and energy levels.

Yes, you can find the time to work on a project between a full-time job, but that leads to very quick burnout and doesn't work too well on creative projects. People have limited creative energy, and full-time jobs demand the best of that creative energy, leaving little to none afterwards. If the project in question is something more menial-labor (ie kitchen renovations) or purely mental (ie doing a school course) it can often be done, but creating a video game is a completely different matter, as I'm sure you are well aware, that creatively creating code burns creative energy like there is no tomorrow; if the coding involved basically repetitious tasks (ie you made a light tank, and now you want to make a medium tank, in the code), then it could likely be done, but creative tasks are generally out of the picture.

You are right however that, having too much time results in wasteful habits, which is something I need to work on.

@leeor_net;

Again, self-analysis can do wonders.

Very true.

I do recall it yes. I also recall that I dismissed it out of a lack of understanding for why you were suggesting it at the time. I understand now the benefit of building a tower defense game, as it would help me to learn how to solve basic common problems, as well as get used to making interfaces, controls, and menus; all very useful things to know. I apologize for being too focused on the RTS to see the value in doing a Tower Defense game.

By having smaller victories, to accomplish the larger ones, is basically the foundation of self-empowerment. It is very good advice to give, again, I was too inexperienced to see the value of the advice, but I do see the value of it now.

Question: As Hooman mentioned above about getting a job and working on the project on the side, and saying that it could be done. So, my question is, now that you have a full-time job again, how is Outpost HD going? Do you feel like you are getting anywhere, or feel the creative urge to work on it? Or are you so tired from the full-time job that you are not able to find any creative energy left to work on Outpost HD, despite it being something you'd like to do? I'm curious at what your response would be.

29
Outpost 2 Programming & Development / Re: Needed Future Projects
« Last post by leeor_net on December 05, 2017, 02:21:04 PM »
...snip... They're a thing being made.

When can we see the fruits of this labor? We have a habit of "We're doing the thing!" and only 10 years later does it show up.
30
General Interest / Re: Motivational quote ;)
« Last post by leeor_net on December 05, 2017, 02:19:25 PM »
Things like: "I want to embark on creating an ambitious open world game, with no experience." But, they are demotivated by friends and family around them telling them they can't do it, or they only have enough money in their bank account for 6 months of solid development time, or their girlfriend tells them that if they spend all that time on the game, then she'll leave you.

This is an excuse for not being intellectually honest with yourself and refusing to take reality into account. If you have no experience, you're not going to be able to build an open-world game in any reasonable amount of time. Battlecruiser 3000AD is a good example of this.

Two serious demotivating things that kill projects, is the feeling that you can't do what you want because you are constantly confused, and the feeling that you can't seek help because you don't know the problem and is constantly frustrating.

Related to my above answer. This is a case of not being intellectually honest enough with yourself to know what your limits are and not having enough experience to know what the problem domain is. I'm guilty of this -- Outpost 3: Genesis is a good example from my past.

Do you remember me suggesting you try to build a tower defense game? I even went so far as to come up with a rough outline for a 'design doc'. That was a hint. :)

I find that many times when someone is far too ambitious they fail to take the advice of those far more experienced than they are. Above and beyond everything that seems to be the biggest factor in 'demotivation'. It's something that's created by their own failure to acknowledge their lack of experience, their inability to recognize their limits and it ultimately leads to failure which creates the feeling that "Wow, this is really hard, I can't do this." The reality is that it's "too hard right now because I have no idea what I'm doing" but by going with smaller victories it boosts your morale and allows you to move forward. OPHD didn't come as a project that I sat down one day and just started. I planned a lot of it out because of a long string of failed and half finished projects.

I think I'm starting to lose focus so I'll close here.
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